Playing Basketball

“Tell me and I may forget, teach me and I may  remember, involve me 
and I will learn!” 

KINDERGARTEN-2ND GRADE CONCEPTS

Some of the concepts we will be working on and learning are:

  • ABC's

  • Reading (Vowels, Sentences Structure and Consonants) 

  • Phonics

  • Writing

  • To recognize and be able to write their full name

  • Name, write and tell letter sounds

  • Handle a book correctly

  • Recognize rhyming words

  • State initial sound in one-syllable words

  • Tell the topic of informational text

  • Use title and pictures to make predictions

  • Follow directions in order

  • The difference between a letter and a word

  • Recognizing genre and purpose of a book/writing

  • Understanding the reading and writing connection

  • Recognize the narrative story format (beginning, middle, end),

  • Recognize the expository format (identify the topic of informative texts

  • To name, write and tell letter sounds

  • That words are made of letters and sentences are made of words

  • Identify and use the words we, a, to, come, me, with, and my in a sentence

  • Predict what will come next based on clues in the story, retell a story

  • Recognize and use sensory words, write a description using adjectives

  • Tell the topic of a story and give details

  • Identify and use action words

  • Tell which two words rhyme

  • Sort shape words

  • Poems

  • Lyrics

  • Rhymes

  • Finger and Puppet Play

  • Dramatic play

  • Identify characters, setting and main events

  • Blend sounds to make a word, hear final and middle sounds in a word

  • Tell how things are alike/different

  • Capitalize the first word in a sentence

  • Use color words when writing

  • Ask and answer questions about text, make inferences, and discuss author’s purpose

  • Focusing on details in writing

  • Using the 5 senses to write Exploring opinions -

  • Identifying pros/cons as things they like/approve or disapprove of

  • Describing emotions - What do feelings look like in writing

  • To tell letter sounds, and write words correctly

  • Blend sounds to make words, and identify middle sound in a word

  • Use capitals and punctuation in writing, and identify and capitalize first letter of proper

  • nouns

  • Identify and use the words come, my, are, with, how, what, you, me, is, now, find, this, will, be go, for, make, play, said and good.

  • Identify similes

  • Use pictures and writing to document research

  • Identify different places to get information (newspaper, internet, TV, etc.)

  • Ask questions while reading, Infer meaning from text

  • Read with expression

  • Tell parts of a letter

  • Write a letter

  • Tell author’s purpose for writing a story

  • Name what I’ve done in the past and what I will do in the future

  • Identify opposites

  • Use verbs in past, present and future tense

  • Make connections to a story

  • Read at right speed

  • Blogging and Penpals

  • Organize information in a numbered list

  • Pause for punctuation in a story

  • Use clues from a story to determine the meaning of an unknown word

  • Identifying suspense in writing - How the main character wonders or asks questions,

  • using riddles

  • Word referents - creative ways to describe characters and objects

  • Understanding how to identify and express an opinion

  • To blend sounds and segment sounds in a word

  • Change beginning sound to create a new word

  • Identify and use the words he, no, make, play, said, good, she, all, do, down, have, help,

  • look, out, take, off

  • Use capital letters and punctuation to write a question

  • Write a report

  • Use capital letters and punctuation to write an exclamation

  • Summarize a story

  • Identify sources to get information

  • Make text to world connections

  • Pause for punctuation when reading

  • Identify how a character feels and why

  • Blend sounds to read words

  • Write letters and words

  • Answer questions about a story

  • Read with expression

  • Tell how things are alike and different

  • Change ending sound to make a new word

  • Tell the main idea of a story

  • Recognize a poem

  • Create rhyming sentences

  • Write a poem

  • Make text to text connections

  • Writing opinions - supporting opinions with reasons

  • Identifying opinions about a book/their favorite part

  • Writing informative sentences

  • Understanding the foundation of expository/informative writing

  • Using technology to enhance writing such as powerpoints

  • Love CHRIST, Self, Family & Others

  • Our Community and the Workers in it

  • Community Service

  • Pledge of Allegiance

  • How to Pray

  • Nutrition

  • Cooking and Recipes

  • Meal Preparation 

  • Structure

  • How to line up single file

  • Routines

  • Follow 2-5 directions in sequence

  • Manners

  • Self-Discipline

  • Spanish

  • Emotions and Feelings

  • Self Esteem

  • Building Character

  • Dressing themselves including lacing

  • Hygiene

  • Housekeeping

  • Morals and Values

  • Parents’ names

  • Family members

  • Friendship

  • Home phone number

  • How to dial 911

  • Fire Safety

  • Stranger safety

  • Medical and Sickness

  • First Aid practices

  • Playground Safety

  • Fine Motor Skills and Gross Motor Skills

  • Sequence

  • Friendship and Bullying

  • Organization

  • Time and Deadlines

  • Themes
  • The World
  • State and World Maps
  • Military Appreciation and our Freedom

  • Monuments

  • Politics

  • Debate

  • Transportation

  • Use Educational software that reinforces reading and math skills

  • Multimedia encyclopedias and dictionaries

  • A digital camera — digital photos can then be displayed in a slide show
    Interactive story books on a computer

  • Use an interactive whiteboard to capture writing electronically

  • Technology terminology

  • Coding

  • Gaming

  • APPS

  • Tablets

  • Laptops

  • Keyboarding (QWERTY) and Using a Mouse

  • Use a Keyboard and mouse: to click, drag, drop, home keys and use the spacebar. 
    Word processing and use email-Learn to change the font, size, and color of the text. 

  • Use Draw and paint software's to type and create pictures. 

  • Presentation software such as PowerPoint to add to a class book or slide show, making a slide with pictures and text.

  • Use Spreadsheets like Excel to organize data, make graphs, work from a template in which the spreadsheet is already created and enter the information needed. 
    Safe Internet research

  • Describe objects using measurable attributes such as length, capacity, and weight

  • Compare objects using measurable attributes to see which object has more of/less of the

  • attribute and describe the difference

  • Collect and organize data to make it useful for interpreting information

  • Collect, sort, and organize data into two or three categories

  • Use data to create real-object and picture graphs

  • Draw conclusions from real-object and picture graphs

  • Graphics

  • Photography

  • Architecture

  • Drawing

  • Creative Minds

  • Spot the Differences

  • Money

  • Budgeting

  • Stocks

  • Business

  • Math Principles (Measurements, Adding, Subtracting, Multiplying & Dividing)

  • Shapes

  • Colors

  • Count forward and backward to at least 20 with and without objects.

  • Read numbers from 11 to at least 20 with and without objects or pictures.

  • Write numbers from 11 to at least 20.

  • Represent whole numbers from 11 to at least 20.

  • Count a set of objects up to at least 20.

  • Recognize instantly the quantity of a small group of objects.

  • Generate a set using concrete and pictorial models.

  • Use pictorial models that represent a number that is more than, less than, and equal to a given number up to 20.

  • Solve problems using the make a model strategy.

  • Identify two-dimensional shapes, including circles, triangles, rectangles, and squares as special rectangles.

  • Identify three-dimensional solids, including cylinders, cones, spheres, and cubes, in the

  • real world.

  • Identify attributes of two-dimensional shapes using informal and formal geometric

  • language interchangeably.

  • Classify and sort a variety of regular and irregular two- and three-dimensional figures

  • regardless of orientation or size.

  • Compose and decompose numbers up to 10 with objects and pictures

  • Show how to count forward and backward to 20.

  • The meaning of one more and one less.

  • Find the value of any given number up to 20.

  • Identify a number on a number line.

  • Identify the order of numbers to help count up to 50 by ones

  • Identify the order of numbers to help count up to 100 by ones

  • Count to 100 by tens on a hundred chart

  • Count forward and backward to 100.

  • Understand addition as joining.

  • Model the action of joining to represent addition

  • Solve word problems using objects and drawing to find the sums.

  • Show how to explain the strategies used to solve problems.

  • Apply mathematics to problems arising in everyday life, society.

  • Use a problem-solving model that incorporates analyzing given information, formulating a plan or strategy, and determining a solution.

  • Select tools, including real objects, manipulatives, paper and pencil, and technology, to solve problems.

  • Create and use representations to organize, record, and communicate mathematical

  • ideas.

  • The meaning of one more and one less.

  • Identify a number on a number line.

  • Understand subtraction as separating.

  • Model the action of separating to represent subtraction.

  • Solve word problems using objects and drawings to find the differences within 10.

  • Show how to explain the strategies used to solve problems.

  • Apply mathematics to problems arising in everyday life, society.

  • Use a problem-solving model that incorporates analyzing given information, formulating a plan or strategy, and determining a solution.

  • Select tools, including real objects, manipulatives, paper and pencil, and technology, to solve problems.

  • Create and use representations to organize, record, and communicate mathematical

  • ideas.

  • Solve problems using logical reasoning

  • Identify, describe, and name pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters

  • Identify ways that income can be earned

  • Identify the difference between earning and receiving money as a gift

  • Identify difference between a want and a need

  • Identify what skills are needed for a job

  • Research and Experimenting

  • Body Parts

  • Days of the Week

  • Months of the Year

  • That weather changes from day to day and over the

  • seasons.

  • There are events in nature that have repeating patterns, such as the seasons of the year as well as day and night rotations.

  • Times of the day such as morning, afternoon, and evening

  • There are objects in the sky such as the clouds, the Moon, and stars, including the Sun.

  • Living things have basic needs that must be met in order to survive, while nonliving things do not.

  • Simple categories and classifications such as food, clothes, and toys

  • Same and Different/Sorting

  • Plants and animals can be sorted based on physical characteristics such as color, size, body covering, or leaf shape.

  • Living things have the ability to grow, change, and reproduce, while nonliving things do not

  • Living organisms have basic needs to survive.

  • Animals require air, food, and water, and some animals also require shelter. Plants require air, water, nutrients, sunlight, and space.

  • Plants are made up of parts such as roots, stem, and leaves and animals have parts such as head, eyes,

  • and limbs.

  • Young organisms such as young plants resemble the parent plant.

  • There are changes that are part of a simple life cycle of a plant: seed, seedling, plant, flower, and fruit.

  • The properties of natural sources of water based on color and clarity

  • How to use, conserve, and dispose of natural resources and materials such as conserving water and reusing or recycling paper, plastic, and metal

  • Water Safety

  • All objects have properties such as size, mass, shape, color, and texture

  • To observe, describe, compare, and sort rocks by size, shape, color, and texture and give examples of ways rocks, soil, and water are useful.

  • Some objects are heavier, some lighter, bigger, or smaller. Students will work on comparing and contrasting the properties of objects

  • Exploring the interactions of magnets with various materials, such as the push and pull between magnets and metals or other magnets.

  • Using the five senses to explore different forms of energy such as light, heat, and sound.

  • Observing, recording, and discussing how materials can be changed by heating or cooling

  • Exploring the interactions of magnets with various materials, such as the push and pull between magnets and metals or other magnets.

  • 5 Senses

  • Using the five senses to explore different forms of energy such as light, heat, and sound.

  • Observing, recording, and discussing how materials can be changed by heating or cooling

  • Observing and describing the ways that objects can move such as in a straight line, zigzag, up and down,

  • back and forth, round and round, and fast and slow. 

  • Using terms such as: Above, below, and beside (next to), Front and back, Over, under, and in the middle, In front of and behind, Closed and open, First, next, and last, Inside and outside (in and out), Backward and forward, Left and Right, Top and bottom, Before and after to describe the location of an object in relation to another.

  • High and low

  • Big and little

  • Largest and smallest

  • Tall and short

  • Wide and narrow (fat and skinny)

  • Medium sized

  • Long and short

  • Same size

  • Fast and slow

  • Many and few

  • Part and whole

  • Night and day

  • On and off

  • Loud and soft

  • Hot and cold

  • Hard and soft

  • New and old

  • Early and late

 

You don't learn to walk by following rules. You learn by doing, and by falling over."
~Richard Branson

3RD-5TH GRADE CONCEPTS

Some of the concepts we will be working on and learning are:

  • Some of the concepts we will be working on and learning are:

  • Read fables and folktales from different cultures and identify the central message, lesson, or moral in the stories

  • Read about science, social studies, and history and determine the purpose and main idea of these texts

  • Read multi-syllable and grade-appropriate, irregularly spelled words (ask your child’s teacher for a list of these words).

  • Read grade-level text with appropriate pace, accuracy, expression, and understanding.

  • Self-corrects mistakes and re-reads when necessary.

  • Talks about and answers questions about a text using specific examples from the text and connects different parts of a text.

  • Reads a variety of texts including, fiction, non-fiction, fables, and poetry, and understands and talks about their main ideas and lessons.

  • Begins to understand the difference between literal and non-literal text such as metaphors and analogies.

  • Uses the text and context to determine the meaning of words.

  • Is able to express his own point of view about characters or a text.

  • Makes comparisons between books written by the same author and books in series that are about the same characters.

  • Answer who, what, where, when, why, and how questions about stories (both in writing and when speaking), using the rules of standard English

  • Describe how an author uses detail to support an idea

  • Gather facts about a topic and describe what was learned 

  • Write about an event with a beginning, middle, and end

  • Write about books using details and examples to back up opinions

  • Writes a variety types of texts including:

  • Opinion Pieces: Students introduce their opinions, note the reasons for those opinions, and provide a conclusion.

  • Narrative Pieces: Students write about an event, using descriptive details, feelings, and proper order — and ultimately provide a conclusion.

  • Informative/Explanatory Pieces: Students introduce a topic and use facts, definitions, and, if helpful, illustrations to further explain the topic, eventually leading to a conclusion.  

  • Uses terms such as: because, since, for example, also, another, and but to elaborate on and make connections in her writing. 

  • Plans, revises, and edits her writing, going through the same process that most writers do.

  • Uses digital tools (under the guidance of the teacher) to publish her writing and interact and communicate with others.

  • Begins to take notes and do research for short research projects.

  • Spends various amounts of time writing a piece, ranging from a short period of time (such as 30 minutes) to working on one piece over the course of a few weeks.

  • Read many types of stories and describe what happened, how the characters were affected, and what lessons they learned

  • Answer questions about reading material that covers history, social studies, and science; also use information in illustrations, maps, and charts to help answer questions

  • Give a class presentation on a topic using facts, details, and specific vocabulary

  • Participate in discussions by speaking clearly, listening, sharing opinions, building on other people’s ideas, and asking questions

  • Use dialogue and description to write about what a character is thinking and feeling

  • Gather information from online sources in addition to books and articles; use that information to write research papers

  • Read and write numbers up to 1,000

  • Add and subtract numbers up to 100 to solve one- or two-step word problems

  • Start adding and subtracting three-digit numbers

  • Measure and also estimate length using inches, feet, centimeters, and meters

  • Solve problems using money values, like knowing that a dime equals 10 pennies

  • Divide circles, squares, and rectangles into equal portions (halves, thirds, quarters)

  • Solve word problems using information from a bar graph

  • Telling time to the minute

  • Recognizing and writing patterns

  • Take measurements and knows the Capacity and Weight, ie:volume, weight, length, and temperature

  • Rounding and comparing numbers and fractions to the nearest tens or hundreds. Understand the ones, tens, and hundreds place in a three-digit number

  • Skip Counting and Using a Hundreds Board

  • ​Multiplies and divides numbers up to 100 using mental math strategies (instead of having to do the calculations on paper) and understands the relationship between multiplication and division. 

  • Understands that 3x5=15 and 5x3=15 (this is the commutative property of multiplication).

  • Understand and identify fractions as numbers that can be placed on a number line; compare two fractions (like knowing that 2/3 is bigger than 3/5)

  • Express whole numbers as fractions and recognize fractions that are whole numbers (like knowing that 8/2 is the same as 4)

  • Read charts, create and use graphs and show data to represent data and answer questions.

  • Learns about and calculates the area of an object using Long Multiplication and addition (specifically by multiplying the lengths of the sides of an object).

  • Solves word problems that require two steps and more than one mathematical action. Understands and creates fractions and uses number lines to represent and compare different fractions.

  • Solves problems involving time and measurement.

  • Learn about Shapes and Solids (and specifically quadrilaterals) and their features.

  • Place Value

  • Lines and Angles

  • Symmetry

  • Data Management and Analysis

  • Estimating

  • Area and Perimeter

  • Decimals

  • Circumference and Diameter

  • Percentages

  • Ordered Pairs on a Coordinate Grid

  • Probability

  • Observes living and non-living things and makes inferences about the observations.

  • Research information on a variety of topics using both text and digital resources.

  • Collects and uses data to support experiments and what she learns.

  • Records her observations both through writing and talking, and uses those observations to explain and make conclusions.

  • Understands what living things need (air, water, and food) and what they do (grow, move, and reproduce).

  • Studies and observes life cycles.

  • Experiments with different types of materials and different matter such as solids, liquids, and gas.

  • Works in groups and as a class to conduct experiments and create projects.

  • Global and historical communities.

  • The connection between a culture and its environment.

  • Studies and uses maps to gain a deeper understanding of geography and how it affects a community.

  • Basic financial needs, such as how different communities support and sustain themselves.

  • Different communities govern themselves and their leaders.

  • Compares both the similarities and differences between different cultures with an emphasis on accepting and understanding why these differences exist.

  • Uses graphic organizers and charts to make comparisons between cultures and communities. 

  • Uses different media such as literature, art, writing, film, and museum visits to deepen her understanding of concepts and portray what he has learned.

  • Discusses American holidays and important days and events as they approach.

  • Geography skills like map reading

  • Internet Safety

  • Sending Important Documents

  • Making Spreadsheets

  • Copyright And Plagiarism

  • How To Read A Webpage

  • Send An Email

  • Demonstrate the ability to perform a variety of tasks: Save, retrieve, and delete files/documents

  • Select appropriate strategies to navigate and access information for research and resource  sharing
    Perform simple searches to acquire information

  • Identify file extensions (.pdf, .doc, .jpg)

  • Use a basic coding program

  • Use external and/or cloud storage

  • Print a document

  • Use more than one program at a time

  • Use the keyboard to type complete sentences, paragraphs, and stories

  • Typing rate of 15 words per minute, with 90% or better accuracy, using proper posture and  technique

  • Basic keyboarding – locates and operates the following keyboard keys:

  • Punctuation keys (period, comma, exclamation point, question mark, apostrophe,  quotation marks, hyphen)

  • Math function keys (+, -, =, <, >)

  • Tab key (to indent paragraph)

  • Shift

  • Escape

  • Delete

  • Backspace

  • Additional URL keys (\,/,:, _,~)

  • Understand the importance of social, ethical, and human issues associated  with technology.

  • Know and follow the school rules for using computers and discuss consequences for inappropriate use

  • Know and use rules of  basic netiquette

  • Identify acceptable and unacceptable uses of computers in society

  • Identify how technology is changing society and career options in areas such as  communications, transportation, and the economy

  • Identify advantages and disadvantages of people using computers to work, learn, communicate  and play

  • Practice internet safety procedures involving sharing personal information and passwords

  • Work collaboratively when using technology

  • Adhere to software licensing agreements and respect the electronic work of other individuals

  • Recognize different file types/extensions

  • Practice safe and respectful use of electronic equipment

  • Discuss the need to cite sources and give credit to electronic sources

  • Correctly perform the following basic skills in word processing:  highlight, cut and paste, delete,  edit, search and replace

  • Identify and discuss multimedia terms/concepts as a class/group  (Ex. text, audio, images, video)

  • Correctly perform the following in presentation software:  choose theme, add slides, add/insert  multimedia, play presentation

  • Use the computer and technology resources to practice learning skills in relation to other  subject areas

  • Recognize that different software programs are designed for specific purposes

  • Explore the navigation/menu of software utilized in the classroom

  • Publish information in a variety of media (ex. printed copy, monitor display, screenshot, video)

  • Locate, select, and use various media to be used to communicate

  • Enter data and create a chart 

  • Identify the best tool to communicate a concept, idea or information

  • Use standard formatting toolbars (ex. font, size, spell check, style, color, etc…

  • Evaluate resources for accuracy, authority, reliability, currency, usefulness and relevance

  • Use electronic reference materials including encyclopedias, thesauruses, dictionaries, maps, and  atlases (Work with Media Specialist)

  • Use software programs/applications to generate tables, charts, and graphs to display data in  various curricular areas

  • Use an electronic library to search for information related to a project (TEL – Work with Media  Specialist)

  • Use the computer and technology resources to gather information on different ways to solve a  specific problem

  • Determine the usefulness and appropriateness of electronic information and apply critical  analysis to resolve conflicts

  • Use teacher-selected websites to acquire information related to a given problem

  • Identify the need for data to be organized

  • Use a prepared list of bookmarks/favorites from a teacher web page to gather  information

  • Use the URL as host of information of a domain (ex. .com, .org, .gov, .edu, etc…)

  • Use technology tools to plan, gather, organize, present, and evaluate information which solves a  problem (ex. graphic organizer, chart, graph, word processor, slide show)

  • Use basic web browsing vocabulary (URL, hyperlink, bookmarks/favorites, search box, and  scroll bar)

  • Use a graph/chart/graphic organizer from a template to represent a simple idea

  • Use appropriate search strategies (identifying keywords for electronic searches and evaluating  relevance, gathering techniques, sorting and reporting information strategies)

  • Use a web browser to navigate the internet using a child-friendly search engine

  • Classification of animals: Vertebrates (with a backbone) and invertebrates (without a backbone) and the similarities and differences of animals.

  • The human body: The skeletal, muscular, nervous systems, reproductive, fitness, cells, digestive, and necrobiome.

  • Using the five senses to gather information

  • Using tools to extend the senses

  • Light and vision: Sunlight can create shadows, and light can be reflective. The color of light hitting an object affects how the object is seen. An object is seen when light traveling from the object enters the eye.

  • Astronomy and space: The properties of suns, moons, planets, and stars as well as their locations and movements.

  • Forces and motion: How and why objects move.

  • What types of science instruction will my third grader get?

  • Learning to ask questions that can be answered through investigation

  • Planning and carrying out investigations

  • Using measurement to make estimates or record data

  • Making predictions and seeing if they occur as expected

  • Basing conclusions on facts and observations

  • Looking for commonalities and differences in grouping objects or events

  • What to look for when you visit

  • Research and book reports about the seasons, plants, animals, and the earth; space, astronomy, and technology; and the human body

  • Learn about scientists who’ve made major contribution to their fields

  • Using materials that encourage hands-on experimentation (microscopes, models, and skeletons)

  • Safety glasses, thermometers, magnifying glasses, mirrors, bar magnets, and rulers

  • Aquariums, gardens, or other areas that allow kids to learn about the life cycles of plants and animals

  • Learning hands-on at museums, zoos, nature centers, local parks and lakes, and botanical gardens, etc.

 
Students with Masks

"Intellectual growth should commence at birth,   and cease only in death~Albert Einstein